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Note: Data Quality - Age at immigration There was a slight overestimation of age at immigration in the Census. Note: Data quality - Certificate or diploma below the bachelor level The overall quality of the 'Highest certificate, diploma or degree' variable from the Census is acceptable. However, users of the 'University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level' category should know that an unexpected growth in this category was noted compared to the Census.

In fact, in the Census, 2. This phenomenon was not found in other sources like the Labour Force Survey. We recommend users interpret the Census for this category with caution. For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the Census Dictionary, Appendix B: Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding. More information will be available in the Education Reference Guide, Census, to be published later in Note: Data Quality - Historical earnings and income data and outliers Changes in methodology and response modes introduced in the Census resulted in improved income data.

However, these changes also mean that some comparisons with data from censuses and some data for the highest earnings and income amounts are affected. For the Census, changes to methods for capturing and processing the Census income data and the introduction of data from tax files may have an impact on the trends analysis for earnings at the individual level in particular but also total income.

There are more reported small amounts in and less rounding of the amounts that now come from tax data. To compare from census to census, users are advised to consider full-year full-time earners as the presence of more small amounts tends to lower the mean and median when considering the full population of earners. As in the past, when considering small populations, one or more outliers may affect the average. In regions with sampling, this makes the estimate of the mean unreliable because of the variance due to sampling for smaller populations.

The standard error of the average should help identify these situations. With extremely small populations, the median might also be affected by the presence of outliers. Users are required to interpret data with caution when the sub-population has small or very small counts. Note: Data Quality - Relationship of Census Income Estimates to the National s and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics Census income estimates of aggregate income in were compared to similar personal income estimates from the national s.

After adjustments to the personal income estimates for differences in concepts and coverage, the census estimate of aggregate income in from comparable sources was 1. As in the past, census estimates for some income components and for some provinces compared more favourably than for others. Census estimates of aggregate wages and salaries, the largest component of income, were slightly higher 1.

This was partially offset by the difference Overall, estimates of aggregate employment income or earnings were nearly identical 0. Employment Insurance benefits reported in the census were smaller by 6.

Census estimates of aggregate child benefits were 2. Overall, census estimates of aggregate income from all government transfer payments were lower by The census estimate of aggregate investment income in was slightly lower This is a ificant improvement when compared to census comparisons. SLID estimates reflect adjustments made for population undercoverage, while census estimates do not include such an adjustment. This adjustment contributes to census estimates showing fewer income recipients However, due to higher average amounts, census estimates of aggregate earnings are 2. Most of the observed provincial differences were considered acceptable in the light of sampling errors in the Survey.

The all-person low income prevalence rates for Canada excluding the Territories were almost identical in both sources for the before-tax measure at For more information on factors that may explain such variances in census data, such as response errors and processing errors, please refer to the Census Dictionary, Appendix B Data quality, sampling and weighting, confidentiality and random rounding. Note: Broad occupational category A - Management occupations Census data for occupation groups in Broad occupational category A - Management occupations should be used with caution.

Some coding errors were made in asing the appropriate level of management, e. Some non-management occupations have also been miscoded to management due to confusion over titles such as program manager and project manager.

Data users may wish to use data for management occupations in conjunction with other variables such as Income, Age and Education. Note: Census family A census family refers to a married couple with or without children of either or both spouses , a couple living common-law with or without children of either or both partners or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex.

Note: Comparability of Place of work data Working at home can be measured in different ways. In the census, the 'Worked at home' category includes persons who live and work at the same physical location, such as farmers, teleworkers and work camp workers. In addition, the Census Guide instructed persons who worked part of the time at home and part of the time at an employer's address to indicate that they 'Worked at home' if most of their time was spent working at home e.

However, the survey data are not directly comparable to the census data since the surveys ask respondents whether they did some or all of their paid work at home, whereas the census asks them where they usually worked most of the time.

Consequently, census estimates on work at home are lower than survey estimates. The place-of-work question has remained in virtually the same format in each census since However, in , the category 'No fixed workplace address' replaced 'No usual place of work.

In censuses, respondents were asked to write 'No usual place of work' in the address fields. It is believed that censuses have undercounted the of persons with 'No fixed workplace address. Note: Dwelling universe The dwelling universe pertains to characteristics of dwellings in Canada. Dwellings are distinct from households. Dwelling characteristics refer to the physical attributes of a set of living quarters, whereas household characteristics pertain to the person or the group of persons other than temporary or foreign residents who occupy a dwelling.

Note: Earnings historical variations Due to improved collection methodology, income and earnings data from the Census is more complete, precise and less subject to rounding than in prior censuses. Small dollar amounts, which in the past may not have been reported, are now more likely to be captured.

Compared to prior censuses, this has resulted in an increased of earners and lower median and average earnings. Users are advised to exercise caution when interpreting census-to-census changes in statistics and counts of specific cells within an earnings distribution. This comparability issue is less apparent when considering the earnings of full-year, full-time workers. Note: Economic families In Census tables showing income data for economic families or economic family members, children of the economic family reference person may have any marital status; and grandchildren of the reference person, where no parent is present in the household, are treated as children of the reference person.

In income tables before , all ly married sons and daughters of the economic family reference person and all grandchildren of the reference person were classified as other economic family members. Where data for are shown in the Census tables, there are 75, more lone-parent families and 75, fewer other economic families in Canada for than as published at the time of the Census.

Similarly, there are 66, more couple economic families with children, and 66, fewer couple economic families without children. Additional information about this table is available in the Dimension Summary Box of the Profile. Return to footnote 1 referrer. Return to footnote 2 referrer. Return to footnote 3 referrer. This variable is derived from Date of birth. Return to footnote 4 referrer.

Legal marital status Part A - Plain language definition A person's conjugal status under the law e. Legal marital status data are derived from the responses to Question 4 Marital status in the census questionnaires. Part B - Detailed definition Refers to the legal conjugal status of a person. The various responses are defined as follows: Never legally married single - Persons who have never married including all persons less than 15 years of age and persons whose marriage has been annulled and who have not remarried. Legally married and not separated - Persons whose spouse is living, unless the couple is separated or a divorce has been obtained.

Separated, but still legally married - Persons currently married, but who are no longer living with their spouse for any reason other than illness or work and have not obtained a divorce. Divorced - Persons who have obtained a legal divorce and who have not remarried. Widowed - Persons who have lost their spouse through death and who have not remarried. Since , Aboriginal people married according to traditional customs were instructed to report themselves as legally married.

Return to footnote 5 referrer. Return to footnote 6 referrer. Common-law status Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to persons who live together as a couple but who are not legally married to each other.

These persons can be of the opposite sex or of the same sex. Census family Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to a married couple with or without children of either or both spouses , a couple living common-law with or without children of either or both partners or a lone parent of any marital status, with at least one child living in the same dwelling.

Return to footnote 7 referrer. Census family structure Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to the classification of census families into married couples with or without children of either or both spouses , common-law couples with or without children of either or both partners , and lone-parent families by sex of parent. Return to footnote 8 referrer. Return to footnote 9 referrer. The average of children at home per census family is calculated using the total of children at home and the total of census families. Return to footnote 10 referrer.

Return to footnote 11 referrer. Return to footnote 12 referrer. Dwelling, occupied private Part A - Plain language definition A separate set of living quarters which has a private entrance either directly from outside or from a common hall, lobby, vestibule or stairway leading to the outside, and in which a person or a group of persons live permanently.

Part B - Detailed definition Refers to a private dwelling in which a person or a group of persons is permanently residing. Also included are private dwellings whose usual residents are temporarily absent on Census Day. Return to footnote 13 referrer. A room is an enclosed area within a dwelling which is finished and suitable for year-round living. Return to footnote 14 referrer. Bedrooms Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to all rooms deed and furnished as bedrooms and used mainly for sleeping purposes, even though the use may be occasional e.

Return to footnote 15 referrer. Tenure Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to whether some member of the household owns or rents the dwelling, or whether the dwelling is Band housing on an Indian reserve or settlement. Return to footnote 16 referrer. Condition of dwelling Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to whether, in the judgment of the respondent, the dwelling requires any repairs excluding desirable remodeling or additions.

Return to footnote 17 referrer. Period of construction Part A - Plain language definition Not applicable Part B - Detailed definition Refers to the period in time during which the building or dwelling was originally constructed. Return to footnote 18 referrer. Return to footnote 19 referrer. Structural type of dwelling Part A - Plain language definition Characteristics that define a dwelling's structure, for example, the characteristics of a single-detached house, a semi-detached house, a row house, or an apartment or flat in a duplex.

In , improvements to the enumeration process and changes in structural type classification affect the historical comparability of the 'structural type of dwelling' variable. In , 'apartment or flat in a duplex' replaces 'apartment or flat in a detached duplex' and includes duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings.

This is a change from the Census where duplexes attached to other dwellings or buildings were classified as an 'apartment in a building that has fewer than five storeys'. Return to footnote 20 referrer. Return to footnote 21 referrer. Household, private Part A - Plain language definition Person or group of persons occupying the same dwelling. Part B - Detailed definition Refers to a person or a group of persons other than foreign residents who occupy a private dwelling and do not have a usual place of residence elsewhere in Canada. Return to footnote 22 referrer. Household size Part A - Plain language definition of persons occupying a private dwelling.

Part B - Detailed definition Refers to the of persons in a private household. Household type Part A - Plain language definition Category to which a person living alone or a group of persons occupying the same dwelling belong. There are two : non-family households and family households.

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