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We would like to use cookies to collect information about how you use ons. We use this information to make the website work as well as possible and improve our services. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Trends in the average of years people will live beyond their current age measured by period life expectancy, analysed by age and sex for the UK and its constituent countries.

This is not the latest release. View latest release. Contact: Sophie Sanders. Release date: 27 September Next release: September Print this Statistical bulletin. Download as PDF. A newborn baby boy could expect to live Improvements in life expectancy at birth for males in the UK have slowed from In to , a man in the UK aged 65 had an average further In to , improvements in life expectancy were higher than in to although they remained very slight with life expectancy at birth increasing by 0.

Period life expectancy is the average of additional years a person would live if he or she experienced the age-specific mortality rates of the given area and time period for the rest of their life. Therefore it is not the of years someone in the area in that time period is actually likely to live, because the death rates are likely to change over time. In to , life expectancy at birth in the UK was This was a very slight increase from to ly UK life expectancy at birth remained virtually unchanged between the years to and to Life expectancy at birth for each of the constituent countries in to is shown in Figure 1.

Life expectancy at birth remained highest in England and lowest in Scotland. Figure 1: Life expectancy at birth, constituent countries to Source: Office for National Statistics Download this chart Figure 1: Life expectancy at birth, constituent countries Image. Figures 2a and 2b show life expectancy at birth in the UK and constituent countries between to and to Life expectancy in the UK steadily increased between to and to from This was equivalent to an average increase in male life expectancy of Between to and to , the rate of increase in life expectancy at birth more than halved to 6.

Part of the reason for this could be that some of the factors that have historically driven life expectancy improvements, such as reductions in smoking and circulatory disease 1 , may largely have been realised. Due to faster improvements in male mortality compared with females, the gap in life expectancy at birth for males and females in the UK has steadily reduced over time, decreasing from 6.

Factors such as a reduction in the proportion of men smoking, the decline of heavy industry and the move away from physical labour and manufacturing industries towards the service sector are all possible contributors. Since to , the gap between male and female life expectancy has remained at 3. In to , male life expectancy at birth in Scotland was virtually unchanged from to , remaining at Female life expectancy at birth in Scotland in to also remained virtually unchanged at Despite this, females in Scotland had the largest average increase between to and to at 5. The gap in life expectancy at birth between Scotland and the UK has grown since to Possible causes for this may be higher levels of heart disease 2 , a greater smoking prevalence 3 and increased levels of alcohol 4 and drug-related deaths 5 in Scotland compared with the other constituent countries of the UK.

For males the difference in life expectancy at birth from the UK peaked in to at 2. Life expectancy in Scotland then began converging towards the UK up until to , when the gap grew again to 2. For females the gap in life expectancy at birth between the UK and Scotland has also increased since to , but by a smaller amount than for males.

The gap for females peaked in to at 1. In to , the gap increased, however, to 1. Life expectancy at birth in Scotland was broadly similar to Northern Ireland in to Since then life expectancy in Northern Ireland has improved at a faster rate than in Scotland and in to life expectancy in Northern Ireland was 1. In to , males in Northern Ireland could expect to live, on average, This was the first time since to life expectancy at birth was higher for males in Northern Ireland than Wales.

Males in Northern Ireland experienced the largest increase in life expectancy at birth since to , having improved by 12 weeks. In comparison, male life expectancy at birth in Wales remained virtually unchanged from to Between to and to , improvements in male life expectancy at birth in England and Wales have slowed by around two-thirds of the historical rate of increase between to and to In Northern Ireland, the rate of increase also reduced but to a lesser extent, by just over a quarter. Females in Northern Ireland also experienced the largest average improvements of all the constituent countries between to and to As a consequence, the gap in female life expectancy between the UK and Northern Ireland has more than halved from 1.

Life expectancy at age 65 in the UK in to was In other words, a man aged 65 in to could expect to live to age For males this was a slight increase of 4. Life expectancy at age 65 for each of the constituent countries in to is shown in Figure 4. Life expectancy at age 65 remained highest in England and lowest in Scotland. Figure 4: Life expectancy at age 65, constituent countries to Source: Office for National Statistics Download this chart Figure 4: Life expectancy at age 65, constituent countries Image.

Mortality rates in the oldest age groups have traditionally been improving at a faster rate over time due to a combination of factors, including the improvements in mortality from circulatory diseases, driven partly by changing smoking habits, the diagnosis and treatment of cancers, and medical and technological advances in the treatment of many other illnesses and diseases. However, as for life expectancy at birth, improvements in life expectancy at older ages have also slowed in recent years. Life expectancy at age 65 in the UK steadily increased between to and to from This was equivalent to an average increase in male life expectancy of 9.

Between to and to , the rate of increase in life expectancy at age 65 slowed to 4. The gap between UK male and female life expectancy at age 65 in to remained the same as in to at 2. The gap between male and female life expectancy at age 65 for each of the constituent countries also remained equal at 2.

In to , life expectancy in the UK at age 90 was 4. A male aged 90 could therefore expect to live on average to age 94 and a female to Life expectancy at age 90 has remained virtually unchanged for the last four years although it has decreased slightly by 3. In to , the gap between life expectancy at age 65 in Scotland and the UK was smaller than the gap in life expectancy at birth but has grown at a faster rate over time for both males and females. In the past the difference between life expectancy at age 65 in the UK and Scotland had generally been greater for females.

In to , this difference was broadly the same for males and females. This contrasts the trend seen in life expectancy at birth where the difference between the UK and Scotland has grown between males and females and has remained noticeably larger for males. As shown in Figure 6, in to life expectancy at age 65 was 0.

In to , this difference was 1. A consequence of increasing life expectancy has been an increase in the proportion of the UK population expected to survive to older ages. As improvements in life expectancy have recently slowed in the UK, from around to , the rate of increase in the share of the population expected to survive to age 90 has also slowed. The proportion expected to survive to age 90 has risen in to , increasing by 0. How life expectancy has changed over time and chances of survival to can be found on our Visual. ONS website. Further statistics on healthy life expectancies and life expectancy by socio-economic classification are available.

Estimates of the very old including centenarians provide the estimated population by age group and sex for the ages 90 to and and over for the four constituent countries of the UK. In the to life tables, population estimates for those aged 90 and over by single year of age are calculated for England and Wales separately using the Kannisto-Thatcher KT methodology.

Prior to to , these have been calculated by apportioning 90 and over KT estimates at single years of age for England and Wales combined based on the respective 90 and over population sizes of England and Wales.

For more information see the Quality and Methodology report. Figures in the commentary in this bulletin are rounded to one decimal place. Calculations in this bulletin have been done using unrounded figures and life expectancy estimates to two decimal places can be found in the datasets for this release. Tell us whether you accept cookies We would like to use cookies to collect information about how you use ons. Accept all cookies. Set cookie preferences. National life tables, UK: to Trends in the average of years people will live beyond their current age measured by period life expectancy, analysed by age and sex for the UK and its constituent countries.

View all data used in this Statistical bulletin. Back to table of contents. Life expectancy at birth in the UK has slightly increased In to , life expectancy at birth in the UK was Figure 1: Life expectancy at birth, constituent countries to Figure 2a: Life expectancy at birth, UK and constituent countries Males, between to and to Figure 2b: Life expectancy at birth, UK and constituent countries Females, between to and to Figure 3: Difference between life expectancy at birth between the UK and Scotland Between to and to Life expectancy at age 65 in the UK has slightly increased Life expectancy at age 65 in the UK in to was Figure 4: Life expectancy at age 65, constituent countries to Figure 5a: Life expectancy at age 65, UK and constituent countries Males, between to and to

66 white male 4 female

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National life tables – life expectancy in the UK: to